soft, i.e. crafty. And Vic Power.

Albers success has this Twins fan wondering, how long can a fluff-flinging pitcher make it in the big leagues? Apparently, if you can’t throw 90+ mph, you have to become crafty to survive. This bleacherreport.com piece from 2011 looks at a number of downy deliverers who have been successful by being crafty.

Albers has been called “deceptive” – I think that qualifies as crafty.

Vic Power - 1963 Topps

Vic Power.

Now there’s a baseball name.

I always liked Vic Power. When he played for the Twins in ’62, ’63, and ’64 he was at first base, and he was always a threat, just because of his name. Vic Power. Vic POWER.

But no, not so much really. First of all, his name wasn’t really Power. And though he could certainly hit – he hit over .300 five of his first seven years in the league – but he was not a big threat to go deep. He batted .290 his first year with the Twins in ’62, with 16 home runs, driving in 63, and was voted Twins MVP that year. His batting average and home runs declined in ’63 and ’64, when he went to the Angels. In his 12 years in the majors he hit 126 home runs and batted .284. He only stole 45 bases in his career, so he was not much of a threat on the bases. Besides his good batting average, he was known for being a slick fielding first base man, and he was really quite good in the field, winning seven gold gloves at first. He made the all-star team six times (twice in ’59 and twice in ’60) and was also the first Puerto Rican to play in the American League.

The thing is, on this day, in 1958, Vic Power stole home. Twice. In the same game.
In 1958 he stole a total of three bases. He got two of them in this one game.
Amazing.
The Indians win it in the 10th inning when, with two out and Rocky Colavito at bat, Power steals home. 10-9, Cleveland. Here’s the box score.

Though he was known as Vic Power for his twelve-year major league career, when he played winter ball in Puerto Rico he used his real name, Victor Pellot.
We loved him as Vic Power, though.
He died in 2005, at age 78.

Good game, Vic.

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