Baseball and Philosophy, edited by Eric Bronson

With the coming of spring and new hope and new adventures, I’ve pulled a few old baseball books off my shelves, dusted them off, and cracked them open, searching for wisdom. I’ve owned this copy of Baseball and Philosophy for probably 6 years or so, and never managed to get past the first inning. (The book is divided into innings instead of chapters, with two essays in each. Nice.)

The book is a collection of essays written primarily by college professors, who examine various philosophical questions raised (for some) by baseball. Questions such as:

  • Is it rational to believe in the Cubs, or in any religious faith?
  • If and when everyone is cheating, is it still cheating?
  • Does a team have an ethical responsibility to play ball?
  • Is the intentional walk unethical?

Yes. Serious, thought-provoking questions indeed, and I’m sure questions that all of us baseball fans have considered at some time, if only subconsciously.

Despite these hard-hitting questions, the book in the past just didn’t resonate with me, for some reason. Despite the fact that the first article in the bottom of the first hit very close to home, a piece called “Minnesota’s ‘Homer Hanky Jurisprudence:’ Contraction, Ethics, and the Twins,” by Paul Horan and Jason Solomon. This is where I always got hung up – perhaps because the top of the first — “There’s No Place Like Home!” by Joe Kraus — also did not capture my attention so much, and, well, sometimes it’s two strikes and you’re out.

However, this being spring, fresh starts, new beginnings, I gave it another chance, and this time I steadily made my way through all nine innings and then the post game “press conference” pieces. This time I generally enjoyed the book — though with any collection of essays you’re going to find some you regret and some that shine.

This time, for some reason, I found the bottom of the first to be of more interest, as the authors discussed the legal and ethical issues raised by the foul, nefarious, dastardly and underhanded attempt of Major League Baseball, Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig, and, it must be said, even the Twins’ kindly owner, Carl Pohlad, to contract the Major Leagues and erase the Twins and the Montreal Expos from the roster of Major League teams.

Whereas, in the past, this article lost me somewhere in the second page, this time I persevered, and found it to be a nicely illuminating essay. Perhaps I was over-tired when I picked this book up in the past. (Not an unusual state of being for me.)

As some of you may recall, in late 2001, the owners voted 28-2 to eliminate two teams from the major leagues. (I’m not sure who the two nay-sayers were, but I imagine them to be, for appearance sake, the owner of the Expos and also Carl Pohlad.) “The teams to be contracted have a long record of failing to generate enough revenues to operate a viable major league franchise,” sayeth Mr. Selig.

This, naturally, created something of a stir. A lot of pointed questions were asked, and, in fact, in December of 2001, Commissioner Selig appeared before the House Judiciary Committee, where he attempted to weasel his way out of some of these pointed questions.

League financial data was turned over to the committee, which revealed, according to Mr. Selig, that Major League Baseball was in Terrible Financial Shape, and that 25 of the 30 major league teams lost money the previous year. Congressman Mel Watt of North Carolina raised the point that it sounded like most of the teams were failing to generate enough revenues to operate viable major league franchises, and then asked how contracting just two of the teams would fix baseball’s large systemic problems.

As the hearings went on the talk turned frequently to the generous tax subsidies given to baseball, and to their anti-trust exemption, and, well, things became increasingly awkward for Snidely B. Selig.

(Riveting video of these congressional hearings on the CSPAN website! Representative Watt appears at about 1:36 in the video.)

Major League Baseball (Mr. Selig) was essentially arguing that this contraction thing was just a simple business decision, an accounting problem, a question of income and outrun. Sound financial management by the guardians of our national pastime.

Minnesota Superior Court Judge Harry Seymour Crump looked at things a little differently, however, and on November 16 Judge Crump issued an injunction that ordered the Twins to stay in Minnesota for 2002, saying basically that this was not just a dollars and cents issue, and that the citizens of Minnesota would suffer irreparable harm if the Twins did not play their 2002 season in Minnesota. Judge Crump, according to the authors, picked up on baseball’s unique position in the law, which rests in part upon a utilitarian notion of the public good. Baseball, and the Twins, provide intangible assets to the community that no monetary damages can possibly recompense.

In a particularly low point for team public relations, the Twins and Major League Baseball appealed the decision, and the essay points out the awkward position they found themselves in. After years of claiming a special legal standing and status, they were now claiming, oh, hey, we’re just a business, just like everybody else… except for our anti-trust exemption. Other than that, just like anybody else. Business as usual. Nothing going on here. We aren’t so special, really. Uh, well, in some ways we are, but here, no, not in this case. You see?

All in all, I found this to be a nice little article about baseball’s odd position in the law and it’s requisite responsibilities.

The best article in the book was written by Professor Ted “The Panther” Cohen, of the University of Chicago, “There Are No Ties at First Base.” This seemed the most personal and heartfelt essay in the book, and it was also the funniest.

Ted is a guy who knows the rules of baseball, and he oversees a pick-up game for kids and parents in a local park. In one game there is a play at first base, and the runner and the ball arrive at the base at the same time, and a bit of an argument ensues:

Then an adult loped in from the outfield and with calm, good sense, and an intention to soothe, spoke softly but firmly, commanding immediate quiet and attention. “It was a tie. Let’s let him be safe.”

It was a perfect remark. It was generous and also fair. It was paternal but not patronizing. It satisfied all the children: the batting team was given a runner at first, the fielding team was given respect.

But it was wrong. I alone knew it was wrong, and had anyone else known it, I would have been alone in feeling the necessity of saying so. “If it was a tie,” I said, “then you don’t have to let him be safe; he was safe.”

The other adult turned his calm on me: “I know it’s a convention in baseball that ties go to the runner.” With that remark he put me with the children, I suppose, as if I were a perverse child and perhaps a bright one, but a child still. I had a brief thought of letting it go at that, but that thought faded like a weak throw from the outfield, and I became the kind of child-adult who is too much for any sensible man to handle. “It’s not a convention,” I said. “The rule says that the runner is safe unless the ball arrives before him. If the ball arrives at the same time, then it doesn’t arrive before him, and so he is safe.”

The other adult was silenced. The older children were in awe. I was trembling with a sense of moral triumph. I can remember nothing else from that game.

I reallyenjoyed the Panther’s quiet sense of humor in this piece. When one second baseman’s father says to him, “You’re being obnoxious,” Cohen writes:

“All the children who play regularly know this about me… but they sense that this goes with the order I give to the game…. They seem to like the structure I supply, the umpiring, and the authoritative commentary on the rules, and I think they are attracted by my obtuse scholasticism.”

After the initial “rhubarb” regarding the tie at first base, Cohen realizes that he must check the rules. “I had spoken with confidence, but I was not really sure.” He discovers, unfortunately, a contradiction in the rules, which state:

A batter is out when after a third strike or after he hits a fair ball, he or first base is tagged before he touches first base.

but also:

Any runner is out when he fails to reach the next base before a fielder tags him or the base, after he has been forced to advance by reason of the batter becoming a runner.

In the first instance, the ball/tag has to beat the runner. Tie goes to the runner.

In the second instance, the runner has to reach the base before the tag. Tie goes to the tag!

Cohen, naturally, finds this troubling.

“With all that charm, and with their natural appeal to my philosophical sensibility, the rules had won me over. Now I found them wanting at their core.

On the other hand, I anticipated that statutory immortality that would be due me. I would effect a change in the rules. It was unlikely that I would be given a footnote in the rule book, but I might well find myself in a Roger Angell essay…”

Well, I’m not going to tell you how this all works out. Perhaps the title gives you a clue. But it was a delightful read, and I learned later that it won a Pushcart Prize in 1991.

All in all, this was a worthy little book of baseball, if not of philosophy. Sometimes it was a bit difficult for me to catch the philosophical nuances. Sometimes it seemed like they were stretching a bit. The articles on the Zen of Hitting and Japanese baseball were pretty interesting, as was the article on Baseball, Cheating, and Tradition. Some of the Press Conference pieces at the end seemed a bit cursory.

Ted “The Panther” Cohen passed away in 2014, at age 74. Good game, Panther.

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Saturday evening, April 30th, 1904: “Brilliantly played Game”

The millers won a tight one in Louisville yesterday, 2-1, a “brilliantly played game,” according to our man in Louisville, though there were four errors in the game. Gene Ford got the win, giving up 6 hits and a walk while striking out five. Ford also scored the winning run in the sixth, getting a hit, going to second on a sacrifice, to third on an error, and coming home on a fielder’s choice. It’s miller time!

The colonels lone run came in the second. Brashear singled, then went from first to third on an infield out, a grounder to short. Not sure how that’s possible, but there it is, black and white. Brashear must have blazing speed? Anyway, he then scored (probably easily) on a fly-ball out. Denny Sullivan tied it up for the millers in the bottom of the frame (YES, the millers are batting last, though the game’s in Louisville. What’s up with that?) hitting a long home run (!) into the center field pasture.

Catcher Weaver has a cannon for an arm, apparently, catching four of the five colonels attempting to steal. McNichol was at third again, and handled eight changes without “a skip.” He also dazzled in a double play in the ninth: with runners on first and second, Hart hit a stinger down to McNichol. He stepped on third for one and tossed across to Lally, but too late to catch the speedy Hart. Lally, though, noted that the runner from first had rounded second and was headed to third, and he gunned the ball back across the diamond to McNichol, who applied the tag for the out. Score that 5-3-5, folks, and some heads-up ball by the millers. The colonels love to run too, apparently.

Meanwhile, our scribe gets a few column inches to provide analysis, and, yes, the millers are speedy. Speedy speedy speedy. Everybody agrees. Can we give it a rest for awhile?

Our scribe is highly optimistic that the club will come home from this road trip above the .500 mark. It’s a shame that they only got to play one game against the Columbus team, because the millers clearly outclassed the Ohioans, and they probably would have won two or three games, if they could only have been played. (Instead of just losing the one game, which was, I guess, an anomaly.)

The pitching has been good, though Ford reported late, so he’s still a question mark. (Analysis apparently done pre-game, as Ford rocked the colonels.) Katoll’s arm, meanwhile, is still said to be in good shape, but Watkins “intends to save Big Katoll until warm weather arrives.” But his arm is fine. But he doesn’t want to take any chances. But his arm is healthy. (Why do I think that Katoll’s got a bad arm? I don’t know, but I suspect he won’t make it through the season. Watty should be looking for more pitching.)

McNichol and Demontreville are having a good contest for third base, with McNichol playing a bit better, but Demontreville has not been released yet because of Fox’s sickness. It looks like Watty will hang onto them both for two or three weeks. Fox is in there playing, yesterday, but I guess Watkins like to have a little depth on the bench.

Hitting is a concern. Only 51 safeties in six games, our analyst reports, which, using a little 1904 sabremetrics, breaks out to just eight and a half hits per game: “This is not good enough batting to suit the fans entirely, but six games is hardly a criterion of the team’s real strength.”  Yes, I think I get what he’s trying to say. He’s right. Hardly a criterion.

Finally, catcher Weaver looks good, as does Leslie. Our reporter thinks that Leslie will probably play most of the games, as long as he keeps hitting.

—-

Meanwhile, at UW Madison, it’s the same old same old.

“Seranaded the professors?” I can imagine what that was like. But I’m not sure what happened with the “vaudeville performance.” Why do I suspect that beer was heavily involved with this? Anyway, thank the lord that the police were on hand to break up the shenanigans. I suspect that that’s the last we’ll hear of Mr. Larue of Chicago and Mr. Davies of Davenport.

the 2069 NPBL Champion, the Louisiana Blaze

Well, as I said, the 19-year plan for world domination worked perfectly, and the lowly Louisiana Blaze became champions of the (NPBL) world this last season.

“How did you do it?” everyone wants to know. Well, I won’t go into all the details of that long and ultimately vindifying season. (Take note, brand new word there.) But there are a couple of stories that are worth telling.

First, as you all know, the Blaze finished third in their division in 2069, 11 and a half games out. This was good enough to get us into the playoffs as the wild card, and we opened the playoffs against the Wisconsin Lumberjacks.

This brings us to the number 1 reason for our championship. Blaze first baseman Thornton Swackhammer just rocked the playoffs.

Thornton Swackhammer – 2069

The Blaze edged Wisconsin in the opening series, 4 games to 3, and Mr. Swackhammer was the series MVP, hitting .379, with 2 HR, 6 rbi, and 5 runs scored.

The Blaze then tipped Kansas in 7 games, and Mr. Swackhammer was the series MVP, hitting .414, with 7 HR, 13 rbi, and 10 runs scored.

In the GEL Championship series, the Blaze rocked the New Mexico Dukes, taking the series 4 games to 1, and Mr. Swackhammer was again the MVP, hitting .313, with 4 HR, 8 rbi, and 5 runs scored.

Finally, in the National Cup series, the Blaze beat the Illinois Jethawks, 4 games to 3, and Mr. Swackhammer was NOT the series MVP. In the final series Thornton only hit .222, with 1 HR, 2 rbi, and 5 runs scored. Left fielder Jimmy Bangs was the Blaze hitting star in the Cup series, hitting .407 with 5 rbi and 3 runs scored. (He wasn’t the series MVP either.) Swackhammer was perhaps tired from all the running around the bases he’d been doing in the previous three series. Overall, Swackhammer hit .337 in the post season, with 14 HR in 26 games, 29 rbis, and an OPS of 1.295. He set new post season marks for runs (25), total bases (85), and home runs (14). Doesn’t get any better than that. Thank you Thornton Swackhammer!

The other big story of the playoffs is the Blaze closer, Babe Glumak. Babe was 35 years old when the season opened, and has been with the Blaze since we drafted him in round one in 2054, a lefty with great potential. Babe came up to the big league in 2055 for a cup of coffee, and joined the club for good in 56, going 12-12 as a starter with a 3.87 ERA. He won the Rookie of the Year title that year. He should have been on his way, but somehow he wasn’t. Something didn’t click. He had all the tools to be a top flight starter, but it never came together. He went 12-9 with a 2.88 ERA in ’57, but then 2-12 with a 7.65 ERA in ’58. 2059, 10-15. 2060, 0-3, and he was out most of the season with a sore shoulder. Sweet Mother of Mercy: was this the end of Babe Glumak? So it seemed. In 2061 he went 7-9 with a 3.66 ERA. He only started 15 games, pitched mostly in low leverage relief. In 2062 he went 9-5, only started 5 games, made 60 relief appearances and had a 4.00 ERA. In 2063 he’s 29 years old, and he only gets into 48 ball games. No starts. A 1 and 2 record. But something else happened. His knuckle-curve suddenly started to drop through the floor. His ERA dropped to 2.20.

In 2064 he’s 30 years old. His knuckle-curve becomes even more vicious, practically illegal, and his sinker bounces off opponent bats as though filled with sand. He goes 12-3, takes over the closer role, racks up 14 saves with a 1.94 ERA, while the Blaze go 71 – 91, and finish in 6th place, 28 games back. Glumak is named reliever of the year.

2065 through 2068, Glumak rules:

2065: 6-4, 45 saves, 1. 49 ERA, 0.83 WHIP, GEL Relief Pitcher of the Year
2066: 6-3, 36 saves, 1.32 ERA, 0.84 WHIP, finishes 2nd in Relief Pitcher of the Year
2067: 8-3, 40 saves, 1.29 ERA, 0.93 WHIP, GEL Relief Pitcher of the Year
2068: 6-3, 34 saves, 1.64 ERA, 0.92 WHIP, finishes 2nd in Relief Pitcher of the Year

This brings us to 2069. The Blaze have a better than expected year. Each month finds them doing a little better than the previous month, and though they finish in 3rd place, they make the playoffs easily as a wild-card, and our starting three pitchers, Boone, Lopez, and Danich, give us reason for optimism. Our hitting has been consistently good throughout the year, our defense is above average, and our bullpen is strong.

Babe Glumak

While the Blaze are improving month after month, Babe Glumak is 35 years old and not the same Babe Glumak as in the recent past. His ball doesn’t have the same zip. His control is off. But he’s a wily vet, he knows what he’s doing out there, and he finishes the season with a 4-6 mark and 44 saves, despite a 4.37 ERA and a 1.61 WHIP.

At the end of the season Glumak has a couple of terrible outings, and it’s obvious that he’s in trouble out there. Probably I should use somebody else as closer. I’ve got two or three guys that could do the job. Xavier Cerda was my AAA closer, earned 31 saves during the season. James Hummer, coming back from an injury, throws 100 mph. Shangoya maybe. Or Smith, who had a great year, with a 1.81 ERA and 1.18 WHIP.

And yet, how can you take Glumak out? He’s been THE GUY for five years. Rock solid. And now, with the playoffs here, you’re going to use someone else as closer? In what will probably be his last shot at the big deal?

Couldn’t do it. Glumak deserved his shot.

Well, Glumak hung on through the playoffs, on guts and moxie. He lost one game in the first round, I believe, but after that he… he managed. And of course it all came down to the championship, the National Cup, the seventh game, and the ninth inning.

Glumak comes in to start the inning, relieving Tim Littlewolf. The Blaze are ahead 3-1, scored an insurance run in the top of the ninth. Three outs away from the championship champagne. And old Babe Glumak is on the mound.

First guy up, An-yi Pei, right fielder, right-handed batter. He works a full count, then grounds out, an easier grounder to Kawakami at third. One down.

Pinch hitter Juan Gomez comes up, batting for the pitcher. Switch-hitter. He takes a ball, then rolls a grounder past Glumak, right to Dino Pinch at second. Easy toss to first. Two down. One out away from the title. Glumak looks deadly serious out there. The Illinois crowd is on its feet.

Centerfielder Bennett McIntyre is up, lead off batter, lefty, hit .317 on the year and he’s 2 for 4 today. He reaches down for a sinker on the first pitch and loops it just over shortstop Ernie Seppi’s outstretched glove. A single. The crowd roars. There is hope.

Second baseman Jake Young steps up to the plate. He’s a righty. Hit .363 during the season, and he’s hit .380 in the playoffs. McIntyre’s taking his lead, he’s got good speed, 13 stolen bases this year. Glumak pitches to Young. Gets a called strike, then tosses one wide, then gets another called strike, nobody like the call, the crowd roars, it looked low. Glumak throws another one wide to even the count, 2-2. Then a low one, and it’s a full count. And then another low one, ball four, runners on first and second.

Two outs, bottom of the ninth, third baseman Diego Santana is up. Another righty. Hit .276 for the year with a dozen HR. The crowd is roaring. Ball one. Ball two. A called strike, inside corner, tough pitch. Ball three, way outside. Another one comes inside, Santana swings, pops it up behind the plate, into the crowd. Full count. Glumak steps off the mound a bit, rubs the new baseball down. Climbs back up to the rubber. Takes the call from Buck behind the plate. Throws. Wide. Ball four.

Bases loaded. Ben Buck gets up from behind the plate to talk things over with Glumak.

Josh Hoffman: Dangerous

Stepping up to the plate is the clean-up hitter, a lefty, Josh Hoffman. Hit .267 on the year, with 24 HR and 96 RBI. Hitting .297 in the post-season. Buck crouches again behind the plate, and Glumak checks the runners, then peers in for the sign. First pitch, inside, Hoffman rips at it, and it shoots back to the backstop, foul ball, strike one.

Crowd on its feet. Deafening. Glumak checks the runners and gets the sign. Hoffman steps out of the box. Glumak takes the sign again. Pitches. A sinker, low and away, and Hoffman can’t lay off. He stretches for it, the ball scoots off his bat, and past Glumak’s glove. Dino Pinch glides over, scoops it up oh so carefully, and then gracefully touches second. Fielder’s choice. Three outs. Game over. The Blaze are champions, and Glumak picks up probably the last save of his career.

Glumak went 0-1 in the playoffs, with 8 saves, a 2.63 ERA, and a 1.83 WHIP.

This spring, 36 years old, he went 0-1, with 2 saves and a 5.87 ERA, and a 2.22 WHIP. He’s pitching down in AAA Baton Rouge to start the year, to see if he can work things out. So far he’s got 1 save in 6 games, 4 innings pitched, 4 earned runs, a couple of HR. I’ve got Xavier Cerda working now as my closer. Picked him up as an undrafted free agent in 2063. He keeps on surprising and improving. I’ve also got young Jon Church in Baton Rouge. Drafted him in 2065, round two. He picked up 41 saves in AA Shreveport last year, with a 2.02 ERA. I’m hoping he might learn a few things from Babe Glumak.

 

I suppose the Twins are training, now…

…and I suppose I should make some note of that.

But last season took a lot out of me. As my high expectations (i.e. World Series) were not just “dashed.”

There isn’t really a word for what they were.

Perhaps “eviscerated” comes close.

Well, anyway, these are the Twins, so they have regrouped and apparently are in Florida again, spring training, as it were, and thinking of the future, and planning for the upcoming season. They’ve got a brand-spanking new front office, new GM, new coaches, a new “pitch-framing” catcher, a new old third baseman, and everybody should still have a bad taste in their mouth from last season. (59-103, lest you could possibly forget.)

Anyway, I’ll have to touch base with the Twins soon — and forgive them — and get up to speed on the doings over there.

And I should also let all you Blaze fans know: The Louisiana Blaze, my team in the National Pastime Baseball League, are Champs! Yes! Yes!  Champions of the NPBL! We RULE.

The NPBL is a computer baseball league that uses Out of the Park Baseball simulation software, which provides an incredibly realistic baseball management experience. I assumed control over the Blaze back in 2050, and my 19-year long-range plan worked pretty much to perfection, as we win the title in 2069 (after finishing third in our division.)

I think more on this later. There were at least a couple good stories there. Suffice to say that “We rule!” and also that it’s also spring training in the NPBL, and last year is last year, we have left it behind and are thinking of the future and planning for the coming season.

Which makes me think that baseball is a zen sort of sport. There’s no yesterday, and there’s no tomorrow. There’s only NOW. And now the Blaze are working on the usual drills, enjoying an off day after winning a 5-3 spring game yesterday. And the Twins are also enjoying an off day after winning a 2-1 win spring game yesterday. And everything is good.

Now if only the Millers could win a game…

 

comings and goings

First, Happy Birthday to Robert Moses Grove, born on this date in 1900.

lefty-grove-3c-fr-txt

Well, what can you say about Lefty Grove? One of the greatest pitchers to ever play the game, if not THE greatest. (I am partial to Walter Johnson, but I grant that an argument could be made for Lefty.) 300 wins. 3.06 lifetime ERA. Nine ERA titles. Seven strikeout titles. Two triple crowns. An MVP award. Those are all pretty good marks. And then consider that Grove didn’t pitch in the majors till he was 25 — he pitched five seasons for the old Baltimore club in the International League, from 1920 – 24. He went 108 – 36 with the Orioles before joining Connie Mack’s Athletics in Philly in 1925.

lefty-grove-mechanics

From 1928 to 1933 Grove played with some pretty good Athletics clubs, and fairly dominated the league:

(League leading marks in bold.)
1928 – 24 wins, 8 losses, 2.58 ERA, 183 K
1929 – 20 wins, 6 losses, 2.81 ERA, 170 K
1930 – 28 wins, 5 losses, 2.54 ERA, 209 K
1931 – 31 wins, 4 losses, 2.06 ERA, 175 K
1932 – 25 wins, 10 losses, 2.84 ERA, 188 K
1933 – 24 wins, 8 losses, 3.20 ERA, 114 K

I guess it doesn’t get a whole lot better than that. Happy Birthday, Lefty!

On the flip side, Kirby Puckett passed away on this date in 2006.

kirby-pucket-3d-fr-txt

It just seems totally wrong that Kirby Puckett is gone already. It seems like he was just out there in center field, just yesterday. Damn.

Seems like everyone loved Kirby from day one. (Day one was May 8th, 1984. Kirby started the game batting lead-off, playing centerfield (replacing Darrell Brown) and went 4 for 5, with a stolen base and scoring a run.) He was the sparkplug on those World Champion teams. He loved the game and he had fun out there. And we had fun watching him play.

We got to watch Kirby-ball for 12 seasons before his career was cut short by glaucoma. In those 12 seasons Kirby got 2304 hits, received MVP votes 9 times, played in 10 all-star games, and finished with a career .318 batting average. He also earned 6 gold gloves in centerfield, and also has the Twins’ second longest string of plate appearances without hitting a home run – 583 plate appearances in 1984, no home runs. (The longest string is by Rod Carew: 591 plate appearances in 1972, no home runs.)

On top of everything else, there was the ’91 World Series. Game 6 was Kirby, game 7, Jack. One for the ages.

Finally, Kirby also had one of the top all-time best baseball names. Kirby Puckett. Almost too good to be true.

Kirby was just 45 years old when he passed away.

Hey, Kirby, good game. Touch ’em all.

kirby-puckett-1987-c-fg-fr

29 April 1904 – Louisville

newsboy-minneapolis-1904-b“MILLERS FALL DOWN WITH STICK”

Read all about it!

The millers lost yesterday to the colonels in Louisville, by a 3-1 margin.

Watty’s colts only managed four hits off the colonel’s Egan, while the elongated Stimmel also tossed a fine game, giving up only six hits himself. Sad to say, poor base running may have played a part in the loss. Watkins can’t be happy about that. Apparently Maloney got caught napping at second base. I assume that billy-maloney-brg-bmeans he got picked off? Ouch! Maloney also got a couple of hits and sparkled out in right field, but I would think that Watkins will overlook those redeeming points and talk to him seriously about the importance of being highly alert while on the base paths.

I’m a bit concerned about the miller’s offence. (As I’m sure we all are.) Here’s the miller rally yesterday, as described by Our Man in the Field:

“The millers’ one score was secure in the fifth, when Oyler lined out a single, Stimmel sacrificed him along, and the shortstop stole third. McNichol bunted, and Dexter fielded the ball home, but Schriver dropped it, making the only miscue of the game.”

That’s probably going to be the nature of the millers’ offence this season: bunts, sacrifices, stolen bases, maybe an error thrown into the mix. I guess, in 1904, that was pretty much the nature of the game. Nowadays we think of the pre-Babe Ruth years as the Dead Ball Era, but back then it was just baseball. Nobody even noticed that the ball was dead. It was just part of the Great American Pastime. It’s a good thing that Watty has assembled a stable of speedsters.

On that note there was an interesting comment by Watty, in yesterday’s paper, I think it was. His theory is that it’s very difficult or impossible, really, to find much good hitting at this level of the game. If a guy shows he can hit, he gets snapped up by the big leagues. And that’s why he’s so focused on speed. Hitting across the league will be weak, and so he believes that the fastest team will create the most runs and thus come out as champions in the end. As long as they are awake out there on the base paths.

Yesterday, more bad weather, but they played anyway and played well. One error for the colonels, none for the boys from Minneapolis. Demontreville was sick, but McNichol played well at 3rd. Oyler was excellent at short. Watty says he will release both Ludwig excerpt-tacoma-times-12-april-1909-wm-ludwigand Roach shortly. Ludwig is apparently not fast enough, while Roach’s work “has been indifferent.” I wonder why he hasn’t released them already. Must be no fun for them. I hope he’s talked to them, and they don’t just read it in the papers. Maybe he’ll yet change his mind about Ludwig, who’s a fan favorite, a game player, and a fine young man, though perhaps not so fast.

Young Munch may twirl for the millers today. Census records seem to indicate that Gustave was born in 1876, which would make him about 28 in 1904. Which makes me wonder how old the rest of these guys are, if he’s “young” Munch?

millers-logo-tilt-glow-c

And in other news of the day:

excerpt-minneapolis-journal-29-april-1904-speed-mark-for-train-b