comings and goings

Just wanted to note that Bombo Rivera was born on this date in 1952.

Not a bad ball player, played for the Twins in ’78, ’79, and ’80, when he fractured his knee-cap and then missed a couple months, and maybe came back to play before he was ready. He hit .271, .281, and then .221 for the Twins, and then never really got another shot at the show.

I wonder if he was held back by his nickname? Did it make him more of a novelty than a ballplayer with some talent? They say he was a pretty good fielder, and had some speed. But I don’t know. Was it hard for baseball to take him seriously? The fans loved him, loved his name, used to chant Bombo Bombo when he played. According to his bio on the SABR website, he got his nickname when he was a kid in Puerto Rico, from one of his father’s friends. Wikipedia says that Bombo means “fly ball,” but I’m not sure about that. But Bombo used the hit the ball high and far when he was a kid, especially high, and pretty soon everyone started chanting Bombo when he came up to bat. (His real name is Jesus, by the way.)

Well, Bombo had a short career in the bigs, but he played for a long time in minor league ball, playing in various minor and minor minor and senior minor leagues up till 1990. Nice thing about baseball: even your average players can leave a mark. Baseball fans across the country remember Bombo fondly. Happy Birthday, Bombo! Good game!

And then there was Thurmon Munson, who passed away today in 1979, when the plane he was piloting crashed in Canton, Ohio.

Thurmon Munson looked like he was a big league catcher for the Yankees. The New York press always makes a big deal out of the player who is the “captain” of the Yanquis. Who’s the captain of the Twins? The Cubs? The Marlins? Nobody knows. It’s maybe an inside secret. Maybe they don’t have one? The Yanquis haven’t had one since Derek Jeter, so, I guess, it’s not exactly a Very Important Position with a Lot of Responsibility. More of an honorific, I guess. Anyway, Munson was Captain of the Yanquis, and it seems like he might be a good one, if you like a hard-nosed s.o.b. for your Captain.

I always liked Munson, ever since he was Rookie of the Year in 1970. It seemed like, back then, you were either a Fisk guy or a Munson guy. I was a Munson guy. Which maybe leads to the question, who was better? Maybe hard to say, since Munson’s career ended at age 32. Another blog post for another time, I guess. But I think I’d take Munson.

The Yanquis were 10 over .500 after Munson’s last game, and they finished the season at 18 games over .500, 13 and a half games behind the Orioles. It would be tough to lose a guy like that mid-season. I would think it would add some perspective, maybe, to the game.

Good game, Thurman.

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A little bit of Today in Baseball History:

 

1894: Joe Judge is born. Pretty good first baseman for the Senators. Played 20 years, hit .298. Happy birthday Joe! (Well, I guess he’s probably passed away by now.)

 

 

 

1935: Babe Ruth hits his last three home runs, playing against Pittsburgh in Forbes Field for the Boston Braves. Number 714 clears the right field grandstand, and is measured at 600 ft.

 

 

 

1951: Willie Mays makes his NY Giants debut, after hitting .477 with the Minneapolis Millers to start the season.
He goes 0 for 5. But still has a pretty nice career.

 

 

and

2019: The Minnesota Twins continue to play pretty good ball, at 34-16. Which is a better record than a lot of the other major league teams, maybe most of them, and probably even all of them. You could look it up. If you’re curious.

 

Happy Birthday, Pythagoras!

Yes. It’s true.

First baseman and first baseball sabermetrician Pythagoras was born on this very day, 13 May, 570 BC. It was a Tuesday. Pythagoras’s father was out at a ball game at the time, a double-header, and his mother swore that things would be different with young Pythagoras. No baseball for him. It would be art and poetry and philosophy.

But such was not the case. Baseball apparently ran in the family bloodstream, on the father’s side of the family, at any rate.

Pythagoras grew up loving baseball, and he played first base for the Samos Philosophers, in the Cycladian Association, back in the 550’s. He could hit the ball a long way, and was known at the time for calculating just exactly how far the ball had gone.

After his playing days were over, Pyth practically invented sabermetrics, and his famous “Pythagorean Standings” are still used to this very day in hot-stove leagues and bars all across America.

Pyth passed away in 495 BC, from a severe case of indigestion, at the age of -75.

After Pythagoras passed away Samos built a baseball park in his honor. There was a Pythagoras Park in Samos from roughly 480 – 440 BC.

The site is now just an empty lot, but the pitcher’s mound has been preserved, with a round marble stone on top of it, etched with “Pythagoras Park: Pitcher’s Mound.”

Some say that Pythagoras is buried beneath that stone. But I happen to think that that’s pretty far-fetched.

Good game, Pythagoras!

 

Happy Birthday Watty!

I was looking through some old blog posts about the Minneapolis Millers 1904 season, which faithful readers will remember we last updated on… ahhhh, 13 March… 2017. (Yikes!)

Sorry about that.

But today I happened to look in old drafts file and I find this: May 5th – Watty’s Birthday.

So Happy Birthday to Watty, William H. Watkins, Skipper of the fleet young herd of Colts that are the 1904 Millers!

Watty was born in Canada, in 1858, and started playing professional ball in 1879 with the Guelph Maple Leafs, in Southwestern Ontario. 1882 finds him living and playing in Port Huron Michigan. Team name unknown. Port Huron Michigonians? In 1884 he enters the  major leagues with the Indianapolis Hoosiers of the American Association. He plays third base, and a little at second and short, and also taking over the managing, where he compiled a 4-18 mark.

on 26 August 1884 he was hit in the head by a pitch from Gus Shallix of Cincinnati, and was carried from the field, “…writhing in pain…” according to newspaper reports. After a few days at death’s doorstep, Watty comes back, and he puts himself back in the line-up on September 11th, and goes 2 for 4 that day. For more about this, see this post from 23 January 2014.

1884, though, is the last year for Watty as a player. From that point on the peripatetic Watkins is the brains behind the plays, managing or serving as business manager or president or part owner with Indianapolis, then the Detroit Wolverines, the Kansas City Cowboys, the St. Paul Apostles, the Rochester Flour Cities, the St.Louis Browns, the Sioux City Cornhuskers, Indianapolis again, the Pittsburgh Pirates, Indianapolis again, the Minneapolis Millers, Indianapolis again, Indianapolis in the Federal League, and, finally Port Huron.

Following his retirement from baseball, Watty found gainful employment in banking and business and city founding. He founded the city of Marysville, MI, and was village President. For awhile Port Huron had a baseball park called Watkins Field. But that was long ago, and is now covered by industrial parking lot:

Watty passed away in 1937 at age 79. He certainly saw a lot of baseball in his life.

Good game, Watty.

A Morning Cup of Coffee

(4/25/19)

Happy (belated) Birthday Red Bird!

Bird1 - WashTimes9-18-21

James Edward “Red” Bird was born on this date in 1890. He pitched for the Washington Senators back in 1921, at age 31. One game. Saturday, Sept 17, 1921. Relief. Five innings pitched, five hits, 3 runs, a walk, 2 strikeouts. One at bat. One Strike out.

The Washington Times was there to cover the action, and reports that Bird was “well received by the fans,” whatever that means. Perhaps fans then were more discerning, and sometimes booed the new guys coming up from the minors? That seems hard to believe.

The independent minor leagues of the day made baseball ownership a bit more entrepreneurial back then. Or something. Mercantile?  This article, (below,) from the same Times, 13 September, reports that Griffith went out and got some new players at the behest of the fans. (Really?) In any case, for whatever reason, Griffith went out shopping in the minor leagues, and came back with a number of “prospects” for the club. Besides Red Bird, “a southpaw from Shreveport in the Texas League,” there were a couple of pretty good players in that shopping cart: fella name of Goose Goslin, from Columbia in the Sally League, fella name of Ossie Bluege from Peoria in the Three I League.

Bird5 - WashTimes 9-13-21

Also a guy named McIree, a northpaw from Virginia Minnesota (no league.) I wonder if McIree ever made it to the bigs?

All told, Griffith harvests 12 new players from the hinterlands. Nothing like a little new blood to motivate your players and stir a little fan interest at the end of a long season.

Anyway, Bird gets his cup of coffee in the bigs. The reporter is fairly positive about his performance, but perhaps for 31-year-old rookies trying to make it big, you cut them some slack.

He calls Bird “a well put-up southpaw from the Texas League…” I wonder what he meant by that. Was Bird highly touted? A prize catch? A sturdy lad?

Bird comes in in the 5th and does as well as anyone could ask, the reporter says, except for the 7th inning. I guess one bad inning out of five isn’t so bad. Bird gives up a single in the fifth, and hits a batter, but nobody scores. Sixth inning, nobody scores. Then in the 7th, with one out, a walk, a single, and Sewell nails a well-hit triple to left-center. Rice was apparently playing over in right center with Sewell at bat, and couldn’t flag it down. But the hit was a hummer, maybe Rice couldn’t have got it in any case, so what can you do? A sacrifice fly brings Sewell home, and three runs are on the board against Mr. Bird.

“Bird disposed of the foe in good style in the remaining two innings.”

So. Not so bad. One rocky inning. One good hit, really. If Sewell flies out to Rice, maybe nobody scores. Maybe Bird plays a few more games, settles down, has himself a major league career, instead of a cup of coffee. But that’s the way baseball go. I wonder what became of Red Bird after his cup of coffee. Did he stick with the club for the rest of the season? Was he let go the next day?

Baseball Reference.com tells us that Bird went 17-12 with Shreveport in 1921, with a 3.76 ERA. In 1922 he was back with Shreveport, but had less fun, going 9-13, with a 4.59 ERA. In 1923 he started the year with the Shreveport club, then went to Memphis in the Southern League, where he went 11-11, and then on to Mobile. In 1924 he started at Galveston, back in the Texas League, then went back to the Southern League, to Mobile and Nashville. In 1925, Texas league, Waco and then Houston. His record was 19-11 in ’25, but more detail than that is lacking. In ’26 and ’27 the peripatetic Red Bird landed in Fort Worth, and he finished out his career there in the Texas League. Red Bird

I looked around a bit in old newspapers for a picture of Red, but found nothing. Baseball Reference has an old picture, looks like from a newspaper, not very good quality, but the best available.

Red passed away 23 March 1972 in Murfreesboro, Arkansas, at age 81, and he’s buried in Stephenville, Texas, where he was born. Back in the Texas League again.

Good game, Red.

Bird3 - WashTimes9-18-21 (1)

 

Kirby Puckett AND Albert Einstein

Both of them, born on March 14th.

I don’t think Albert was much of a baseball fan. There’s some story that he tutored catcher Moe Berg in physics, but I don’t know the details.

This autographed ball is up for auction at Coach’s Corner Sports Auction. I’m no expert, but perhaps I’m a bit skeptical. Still, it’s a nice looking ball. Strong signature. Plus the E=mc2 equation! His most famous equation, right below the signature. Nice!

 

Happy Belated Birthday, Al. Good game.