—> 9 <—

Could it get any bigger than this?

The Twins go to Cleveland with a tenuous 3.5 game lead. It’s a three game series, and the first game is rained out. So: double-header time. There’s still a good number of games left, so everything doesn’t actually ride on this series. But it kind of feels like it does. The Twins have taken some blows lately, losing Pineda and Buxton. They’ve lost a few games, and the Spiders are breathing down their necks now, and here we are, playing in the Clevelander’s home park, the Spider Web. Play-off baseball. A doubleheader with the top two teams.

There is great potential for disaster.

But the boys come out and take the first one, 2-0, with shut-down pitching from the law firm of  Smeltzer, Littell, Duffy, Romo, and Rogers. Polanco gets a two-run homer to win the game. And then the Twins actually sweep the doubleheader, coming back from a 5-2 deficit in game two. They tie it up in the 8th, 5-5, and with the bases loaded and one out Sano crushes the first pitch into the left field stands.

Twins win, 9-5.

They are up by 5.5 games. And the radio broadcast crew say the words: “magic number.”

And the Magic Number is

9.

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Happy Birthday, Pythagoras!

Yes. It’s true.

First baseman and first baseball sabermetrician Pythagoras was born on this very day, 13 May, 570 BC. It was a Tuesday. Pythagoras’s father was out at a ball game at the time, a double-header, and his mother swore that things would be different with young Pythagoras. No baseball for him. It would be art and poetry and philosophy.

But such was not the case. Baseball apparently ran in the family bloodstream, on the father’s side of the family, at any rate.

Pythagoras grew up loving baseball, and he played first base for the Samos Philosophers, in the Cycladian Association, back in the 550’s. He could hit the ball a long way, and was known at the time for calculating just exactly how far the ball had gone.

After his playing days were over, Pyth practically invented sabermetrics, and his famous “Pythagorean Standings” are still used to this very day in hot-stove leagues and bars all across America.

Pyth passed away in 495 BC, from a severe case of indigestion, at the age of -75.

After Pythagoras passed away Samos built a baseball park in his honor. There was a Pythagoras Park in Samos from roughly 480 – 440 BC.

The site is now just an empty lot, but the pitcher’s mound has been preserved, with a round marble stone on top of it, etched with “Pythagoras Park: Pitcher’s Mound.”

Some say that Pythagoras is buried beneath that stone. But I happen to think that that’s pretty far-fetched.

Good game, Pythagoras!

 

another day on top

Another day dawns. The MLB website confirms.

25. Yup. 13. Yes.

Still the best record in baseball. Technically. This  is not something we’re used to, or very comfortable with. We hope that maybe nobody finds out. Probably best not to make a big deal about it. Maybe it will slip under the radar.

The Twins survived yesterday’s doubleheader, losing the first but then salvaging a split with a win in the nightcap. CJ Cron hit a couple home runs yesterday. Kohl Stewart came up from the minors for a cup of coffee and got the win, giving up 3 in 6.

Jake Odorizzi pitched Friday against the Tigers, got the win and extended his string of scoreless innings pitched to 20. He last gave up a run on April 22nd.

There’s a story going ’round about how, during the off-season, Odorizzi was working out down there at the Baseball Ranch in Plant City, Florida, and how one night he took himself to some lonely and forgotten backwoods crossroads, and how there at that crossroads he sold his soul to the devil. That’s what I’ve heard. I don’t know if it’s true or not. Maybe, like he says, he just smoothed out his mechanics down there at the Baseball Ranch. Yeah, that’s probably it. Probably mechanics.

In any case, he’s having a very nice year so far, which has been a big plus. He’s been Lights Out. It’s a bit unexpected after last season. When he was 7-10. With a 4.49 ERA.

Mechanics can be pretty important, I guess. Maybe.

Perhaps Mitch Garver also worked on his mechanics down there at that same crossroads: 70 at bats, 25 hits, .357, 4 doubles, a triple, 8 hr, 1.223 OPS.

Anyway.

The Twins are doing well. Let’s just hope that nobody notices.

Trade

Down to the crossroads
Just one more mile per hour, just
A little more fire

Sweep!

I have not found a good source of data on a team’s record in doubleheaders. I’m sure there must be a source out there that will tell you everything you want to know about twin bills, and will tell you when the last time the Twins swept a double header. But I did not find it. I should look a little harder, probably.

I figured the Twins had not swept a double header since, oh, 1991, maybe. Or maybe in the late 60’s. But no. I was wrong. A very reliable source — this very blog — tells me that the Twins swept a double header in 2013. And in 2014.

Being a Twins fan, I think it’s Highly Unlikely that they’ve swept a doubleheader since then. Twins fans usually go into doubleheaders with nervous trepidation, hoping for — best of all possible worlds — a split, with a win in the first game so we can relax a bit in the second. It would be interesting to know the Twins overall record in Doubleheaders. I would guess something like 5 sweeps, 17 splits, and 46 swepts. That’s what it feels like, anyway. Statistics be damned.

Back in 2013 and 2014 I don’t even mention the hapless team that we victimized. I was probably stunned. Perhaps I didn’t want to embarrass the other team in print. I’m all old-school, and I’m sure I would have said something like, good games, the breaks just happened to go our way today.

Not only did they sweep, yesterday, the Orioles, by the way, they also knocked the ball around quite a bit. Three players hit two home runs, Rosario, Cruz, Garver, and the boys hit 11 homers total, 8 in game two, as they took the first game 6-5 behind Berrios, and game two, 16-7, behind Perez. How often do three players hit 2 home runs in an away game doubleheader? Well, you can look it up, maybe. Or maybe this is a first. Either way, it’s fun.

And thusly we tie the Naps of Cleveland for first in the junior circuit mid-america division.

It was interesting looking back at those old blog posts. Hicks and Florimon and Doumit and Butera and Parmalee and the Great Colabello. Where have you gone Joe DiMaggio? Time moves on. The players come and go. Young rookies turn into seasoned vets turn into, god forbid, managers. We fans, happily, stay the same age forever.

And I find it interesting to note that I had a blog category for “losing,” but not for “winning.” Very telling, I suppose.

And now, the return of…

 

Doubleheader

Two wins in one day!
Ha! Show me a better team!
That was yesterday.