20 Over

36 wins, 16 losses.

20 games over .500.

When was the last time the Twins were 20 games over .500?

Well, I can’t say for sure, but looking back at the Twins records over the years, I notice that in 2010 the Twins finished the season at 94-68, 26 games over. And they were 92-60 on September 22nd. 32 games over. So. Not so very long ago, really, in baseball time. Just nine years ago. That was the season when Morneau was hitting .345, with 18 HR and 56 RBIs and then he got the concussion on July 7th that changed his life. Damn. That was the season when Delmon Young hit .298 with 21 hr and 112 rbi. Orlando Hundson played second base, seriously, hit .268 with 133 hits. Who remembers Orlando Hudson? Anybody? Buhler?

Anyway, Joe Mauer hit .327 (pre-concussion days as well,) JJ Hardy played shortstop, Jason Kubel was in the outfield, Danny Valencia was at third, and Cuddyer was at first (post-Morneau). Pavano won 17 games, Liriano 14, Kevin Slowey, 13. Brian Duensing won 10 in relief. Scott Baker won a dozen. Jon Rauch was our closer, got 21 saves. Wow, this seems like ancient history, and it’s just nine seasons ago. Matt Capps also had 16 saves that year. Matt Capps! I think Rauch must have got hurt, there.

Then, in 2011 the Twins turned it around and went 63-99. Morneau hit .227, and probably shouldn’t have been out there playing. Nishioka hit .226 at shortstop, till he got hurt. Yes, Nishioka, that was his season in the sun. Drew Butera played 93 games at catcher and hit .167. Yes, that’s right. Not a typo. .167. Butera was really known more for his defense than his bat. I guess Mauer must have got hurt. Concussion? Mauer played 82 games and hit .287. Delmon Young, .266, 4 hr. Jim Thome came on board and hit a dozen. Cuddyer hit .284 with 20 hr and 71 rbi. Chris Parmalee came up for a cup of coffee and hit .355 in 76 at bats. Pavano, 9-13, Duensing 9-14, Liriano, 9-10. Capps went 4-7, with 15 saves. Well, need I go on? 2011 was not a good season. And following on the heels of 2010, it was particularly brutal. And the sudden demise of Morneau and Mauer, that was just brutal. Ouch.

It’s remarkable, really, how quickly things can go south.

2010: scored 781, allowed 671
2011: scored 619, allowed 804

But.

2019, so far: scored 315, allowed 204.

That’s correct, folks. It’s still May, and the Twins have scored 315 runs.

It’s been a pretty good month.

Good enough, in fact, for the Twins to capture the number 4 spot on the MLB power rankings. Yes. That’s right. Number 4. That’s how good we are right now, according to the MLB power rankings. Right behind the Astros, the Dodgers, and the Yankees.

Number 4 is ours. All ours. We are 4th!

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A little bit of Today in Baseball History:

 

1894: Joe Judge is born. Pretty good first baseman for the Senators. Played 20 years, hit .298. Happy birthday Joe! (Well, I guess he’s probably passed away by now.)

 

 

 

1935: Babe Ruth hits his last three home runs, playing against Pittsburgh in Forbes Field for the Boston Braves. Number 714 clears the right field grandstand, and is measured at 600 ft.

 

 

 

1951: Willie Mays makes his NY Giants debut, after hitting .477 with the Minneapolis Millers to start the season.
He goes 0 for 5. But still has a pretty nice career.

 

 

and

2019: The Minnesota Twins continue to play pretty good ball, at 34-16. Which is a better record than a lot of the other major league teams, maybe most of them, and probably even all of them. You could look it up. If you’re curious.

 

Happy Birthday, Pythagoras!

Yes. It’s true.

First baseman and first baseball sabermetrician Pythagoras was born on this very day, 13 May, 570 BC. It was a Tuesday. Pythagoras’s father was out at a ball game at the time, a double-header, and his mother swore that things would be different with young Pythagoras. No baseball for him. It would be art and poetry and philosophy.

But such was not the case. Baseball apparently ran in the family bloodstream, on the father’s side of the family, at any rate.

Pythagoras grew up loving baseball, and he played first base for the Samos Philosophers, in the Cycladian Association, back in the 550’s. He could hit the ball a long way, and was known at the time for calculating just exactly how far the ball had gone.

After his playing days were over, Pyth practically invented sabermetrics, and his famous “Pythagorean Standings” are still used to this very day in hot-stove leagues and bars all across America.

Pyth passed away in 495 BC, from a severe case of indigestion, at the age of -75.

After Pythagoras passed away Samos built a baseball park in his honor. There was a Pythagoras Park in Samos from roughly 480 – 440 BC.

The site is now just an empty lot, but the pitcher’s mound has been preserved, with a round marble stone on top of it, etched with “Pythagoras Park: Pitcher’s Mound.”

Some say that Pythagoras is buried beneath that stone. But I happen to think that that’s pretty far-fetched.

Good game, Pythagoras!

 

Not a Great Cup of Coffee

In fact, I’ll say it.

A bad cup of coffee.

Mike Palagyi was 21 years old when came up with the Senators for his shot at the majors on 18 August 1939. He had a bit of a rough outing. But I’m sure it wasn’t helped by the fact that three of the four batters he faced were future Hall-of-Famers: Jimmy Foxx, Ted Williams, and Joe Cronin. Probably most rookies would have been a bit intimidated by that, and Mike was a little wild that day.

He came into the game for the top of the 9th inning, with the Senators down 3-1 against the Red Sox. He walked Doc Cramer, to lead off the inning, and then hit Foxx. I’m sure Foxx let him hear about it. He then walked Williams, to load the bases, and then walked Cronin to force in a run. At that point, the manager made the walk to the mound and pulled him. And that was it for Mike. Fifteen pitches. Two strikes. And his career ERA is infinite, as he did not get an out. Wikipedia says he is one of 19 players with a career infinite ERA. Nice to have company in that regard, I guess. I suspect he is the only one of the lot that found three Hall-of-Famers in his cup of coffee. Ouch. Bad enough just having to pitch to Ted Williams. “It was a real nightmare,” Mike said later.

I’m not entirely clear why the Senators called Mike up. He was playing B level ball for Cleveland at Spartenburg in the Sally league that season. Baseball Reference.com says he went 7-6, with a 4.07 ERA. It looks like the Senators acquired his contract and brought him up immediately to see what he looked like. The Senators finished the season with a 67-85 record, 6th place. It seems like they might have been able to run Palagyi out there another time, given him another opportunity, without hurting their chances a lot.

But they didn’t.

Mike played for Greenville in the Sally League the next season, 1940, for Washington, and went 13-15 with a 5.14 ERA. After that Mike was in the military, and after that I see that he played again in 1946 for Montgomery, 2 innings. But his arm “just didn’t have it,” and Mike left organized ball.

And after that? Mike returned to Ohio, where he worked as a plumber and maintenance man until he retired in 1982. He passed away 21 November 2013, age 96.

Good game, Mike.

Happy Birthday Watty!

I was looking through some old blog posts about the Minneapolis Millers 1904 season, which faithful readers will remember we last updated on… ahhhh, 13 March… 2017. (Yikes!)

Sorry about that.

But today I happened to look in old drafts file and I find this: May 5th – Watty’s Birthday.

So Happy Birthday to Watty, William H. Watkins, Skipper of the fleet young herd of Colts that are the 1904 Millers!

Watty was born in Canada, in 1858, and started playing professional ball in 1879 with the Guelph Maple Leafs, in Southwestern Ontario. 1882 finds him living and playing in Port Huron Michigan. Team name unknown. Port Huron Michigonians? In 1884 he enters the  major leagues with the Indianapolis Hoosiers of the American Association. He plays third base, and a little at second and short, and also taking over the managing, where he compiled a 4-18 mark.

on 26 August 1884 he was hit in the head by a pitch from Gus Shallix of Cincinnati, and was carried from the field, “…writhing in pain…” according to newspaper reports. After a few days at death’s doorstep, Watty comes back, and he puts himself back in the line-up on September 11th, and goes 2 for 4 that day. For more about this, see this post from 23 January 2014.

1884, though, is the last year for Watty as a player. From that point on the peripatetic Watkins is the brains behind the plays, managing or serving as business manager or president or part owner with Indianapolis, then the Detroit Wolverines, the Kansas City Cowboys, the St. Paul Apostles, the Rochester Flour Cities, the St.Louis Browns, the Sioux City Cornhuskers, Indianapolis again, the Pittsburgh Pirates, Indianapolis again, the Minneapolis Millers, Indianapolis again, Indianapolis in the Federal League, and, finally Port Huron.

Following his retirement from baseball, Watty found gainful employment in banking and business and city founding. He founded the city of Marysville, MI, and was village President. For awhile Port Huron had a baseball park called Watkins Field. But that was long ago, and is now covered by industrial parking lot:

Watty passed away in 1937 at age 79. He certainly saw a lot of baseball in his life.

Good game, Watty.

Good ol’ Halsey Hall

 

Halsey Hall, for those not in the know, was a newspaper reporter and broadcast journalist in the Twin Cities, and covered the Twins on radio with WCCO and Herb Carneal from 1961 to 1972. He passed away in 1977 at age 79, but the legend lives on, and the local branch for SABR is named the Halsey Hall chapter.

They’ve put a nice little bio of Halsey on line, it’s practically mandatory reading for all true fans of the Minnesota Twins.

Holy cow!

Halsey said it first, and he said it best.

Hall Carneal and Scott

Good game, Halsey