Update

Another nice wind for the Twins yesterday. Here’s Dozier getting ‘er done:

Twins 3, Giants 2, Berrios gets his 5th win.

Local press seem to think that this can’t last. I disagree. (Yeah, I’m the guy that thought they’d be in the series last year. Maybe I was just a year off? An 0-9 start can throw you off for awhile.)

Probably too early still to be thinking about magic numbers.

Nice story on the Twins website about tomorrow’s starter for the Twins, Nik Turley. Nik’s spent 10 years in the minors, including a spell in an independent league, after being drafted in the 50th round by the Yankees in the 2008 draft. He was released in 2014 by the Yankees “after experiencing arm-tightness” (Those Yankees!) and spent most of 2016 with the independent Somerset Patriots. He did pretty well there, and the Twins picked him up. And now he’s done pretty well in the minors: 45 strikeouts in 24.3 innings at Chattanooga, with a 0.37 ERA. 39 strikeouts in 28.3 innings in Rochester, with a 3.49 ERA.

That’s not a lot of innings to go on. They may be rushing Nik a bit, but Santiago has gone on the DL and the Twins need a pitcher, so what the heck. Let’s go Nik!

Turley reminds me of Chris Colabello. He’s with Cleveland’s AAA club right now, Columbus, hitting .229 with five HR. I wonder what happened with him? In 2015 he hit .321 with Toronto, with 15 HR and 54 rbi. In 2016: .069 batting average, 2 hits in 29 at bats. And then he hit .180 in AAA at Buffalo. Very very odd.

Well a little research turns this up: PED, and an 80 game suspension. Damn.

Very very unfortunate.

Here’s a nice shot of Colabello I took a few years ago. One of my favorites:

Here’s hoping that Chris can get back on track.

 

 

Crazy ’08

It seems like I’ve been reading a lot of baseball books of late. It’s all relative, I suppose. After reading almost no baseball books in 2016, anything would seem like a big increase.

I’ve recently finished Crazy ’08, by Cait Murphy, a recap of the madcap 1908 baseball season, focusing primarily on the National League race between the New York Giants, the Chicago Cubs, and the Pittsburgh Pirates, while not ignoring the American League contest between the Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers, and the Cleveland Naps.

This book caught my eye primarily because of my own efforts at covering the Minneapolis Miller’s 1904 season, and I wanted to see how Murphy approached this project. Murphy has the advantage of having an abundance of primary source material, as she is covering the major leagues in the big cities, where there were probably a few newspapers in each city covering the story. Murphy uses her sources well, (and footnotes exhaustively, for those who like that sort of detail,) and we get to enjoy a number of little background stories to the season which add depth and color to the story — such as how particular umpires are viewed in the different cities, and about the huge controversy and final resolution of the in-famous Merkle game of 23 September.

While you might quibble with Murphy’s hyperbole regarding 1908 (“The best season in baseball history is 1908.”) 1908 certainly deserves consideration. The season is full of historic characters and exciting baseball. Honus Wagner, Ty Cobb, Christy Mathewson, Frank Chance, Cy Young, Nap LaJoie, Addie Joss, Ed Walsh, Eddie Collins, Walter Johnson, Tris Speaker, and even Bull Durham were all playing in ’08, and with both pennant races going down to the final days, the baseball was fierce and frequently unbelievable. For example, in the October 2nd game between Cleveland and the White Sox. Cleveland is 1/2 game behind the Tigers, and the White Sox are 1 1/2 back, and they’re both running out of time. Ed Walsh pitches for the White Sox and he is nearly flawless. He strikes out 15, gives up just four hits and a single un-earned run. (Curiously, Murphy says that Walsh strikes out 16 in that game. All the other sources I’ve looked at say 15. Odd that Murphy would make an error like that covering such a big game. Perhaps the pennant-race pressure got to her.) Anyway, Walsh strikes out 15, but he loses anyway. Cleveland wins 1-0, as Addie Joss throws a perfect game for the Naps. Chicago drops 2 1/2 games back with only four games left to play.

As the ol’ perfesser used to say, you could look it up. In the end, the Cubs beat the Tigers in the World Series, four games to one, with both clubs probably exhausted from the pennant race. I like that about old-time baseball. There’s the regular season, everyone going all out to end up on top. And then there’s the World Series. Not 5 rounds of playoffs. The two league champions meet for the ultimate test. I wonder if we would have seen the Tigers and the Cubs in the ’08 series if they had had playoffs? Probably not. How often do the two teams with the best regular season record show up in the World Series? I’d be surprised if that’s ever happened since wild card teams were introduced. Some say that it makes baseball more exciting, the fact that in the playoffs – “Anything can happen!”  I guess I don’t see it that way. I’d like the regular season, the long campaign, to have more importance than it does.

That being said, I really enjoyed this book quite a lot! Murphy made the season and the players and the pennant races come alive. It would be a perfect read in the dark days of December, when baseball is most distant and most needed. And it would be a perfect read tomorrow, too. Nicely done, Cait Murphy!

Vargas. With an HR.

So far, so good.

If you are a Twins fan you have to be pretty happy with the way the team is playing this year. Last night, a two-run pinch hit home run by Kennys Vargas ties the game up in the bottom of the 9th, and a fly-ball by Polanco brings Mauer in to score in the 10th for the win over KC.

Hector Santiago gave up 3 runs in his five innings, and Duffy, Belisle, Rogers, and Kintzler (W) shut the door after that.

Last year at this time: 10-28. (ouch.)

Today’s a rain out, and, so, a very good day to read a book about baseball. I have been busy in that regard, and have read some excellent books, and I’ll leave that teaser there for another post.

 

 

walk-off

Joe Mauer gets his first career walk-off homer last night as the Twins take one from Boston. As all Twins fans know, a Twins game isn’t over until it’s OVER. That is to say, the Twins took a 3-1 lead into the top of the ninth, and started the bottom of the frame tied 3-3. Nothing is ever really in the bag for the Twins, except for this, the walk-off HR in the bottom of the ninth. That’s a lead that’s pretty safe. In the bag. Put it in the win column. Touch ’em all, Joe Mauer.

The boys have been showing some resiliency this season. Or maybe it’s just that Ervin Santana has been untouchable? No, I guess there’s a bit more too it than that. But, as we say in Minnesota, So Far, So Good.

Rosario Rocks

Eddie Rosario finds a four-seam fastball in a convenient location and sends it air-express to a fan in the centerfield bleachers. His first homer of the year drives in three and puts the Twins up 6-3 against the Tigers in the sixth. That’s how it ends, and the boys are back at .500 and within a game of the division leading Spiders of Cleveland.

Afternoon games coming up Saturday and Sunday; good seats are still available!

 

 

Happy Jackie Robinson Day!

What America Needs in 2017 is more Baseball Related Holidays.

There’s a lot of other things America needs, but I think Baseball Holidays is an achievable goal.

Say, for instance, when the hell are we going to start celebrating Larry Doby Day. Major League Baseball was not integrated until Larry Doby got the job done. And it wasn’t any easier in the American League. So: Larry Doby Day. That’s July 5th, by the way. Let’s make a little noise for Larry on that day. Wednesday. It’s the Twins vs the Northern Part of Southern California Centering on the Greater Los Angeles Metropolitan Statistical Area Angels of Anaheim and Proximous Suburbs.

The Twins drop another tough one last night, 2-1, and again fall a game out of first. They jump into a quick lead today, but True Twins fans know that early leads are never secure, and the ball game isn’t over till it’s over, and pride cometh before the fall. Pressly took the loss, yesterday, gave up the go-ahead homer in the 7th.

I need to do a bit of research on these 2017 Twins. I have to admit, I kind of lost track of things last year, and now I find that there’s quite a few names on the team that really don’t sound familiar. For a team that didn’t really make a lot of moves in the winter, there seems like a lot of new names. Though it wouldn’t surprise me too much if some of the guys on last year’s team just changed their names so as to start fresh with a new life and a clean slate. Probably a good choice for some of them.

Some might be thinking of me now as a fair-weather fan, but no no no, I don’t think that’s the case. I think last year it was simply a matter of self-preservation. It’s not that I don’t care, it’s that I care too much.

Well, that’s my story, and I’m sticking with it.

I was also thinking that I might need to find a team to root for over in the National League, now that the Cubbies are the best team in baseball. I don’t feel honest, rooting for the top dog. I relate more to someone with limited talent but good intentions. Two possibilities are the Washington Senators er, Nationals. Seems like we are kind of related to them. And then there’s the Giants, who almost moved here back in the day. Could have been the Twin Cities Giants? The Minneapolis Giants? The Giants and the Nationals are a bit too good to really root for. So maybe the Braves, who had a terrible season last year, and who aren’t the Reds or the Padres, who were similarly terrible but who are the Reds and the Padres. Or perhaps the Phillies, because who roots for the Phils?

Obviously, more thought is required on this. Safe to say that the Nats and the Giants and the Reds and the Padres are not in contention for the honor.

And a stray tangentially-related thought: can we finally get rid of the designated hitter now? Haven’t we given it a fair trial? I am pretty sure that it was suppose to be a three-month deal! A test case. I’m pretty sure that’s how it was presented. I’m going to check on that. But anyway, here it is, 44 years later now, and we’re still doing this? Yeesh.

SAD! NOT NICE!

As long as we’re adding baseball holidays to the calendar, let’s put the ki-bosh on the DH as well. Posterity will thank us, (if there is any posterity.)

Game update: Still 5-0. Mr. Santana is tossing “a pretty good game.”

But it’s only the 8th inning. Plenty of outs left to play.

Update: It’s over. Twins win.

line score 4-45-2017

A pretty nice day for Mr. Santana. Doesn’t get a whole lot better than that. A one-out single in the third, to catcher Omar Narvaez.