Good ol’ Halsey Hall

 

Halsey Hall, for those not in the know, was a newspaper reporter and broadcast journalist in the Twin Cities, and covered the Twins on radio with WCCO and Herb Carneal from 1961 to 1972. He passed away in 1977 at age 79, but the legend lives on, and the local branch for SABR is named the Halsey Hall chapter.

They’ve put a nice little bio of Halsey on line, it’s practically mandatory reading for all true fans of the Minnesota Twins.

Holy cow!

Halsey said it first, and he said it best.

Hall Carneal and Scott

Good game, Halsey

lights out

Well, they did it to us again, those damnable Yankees. And thus endeth a very nice season for the hometown club.

Other than for the final game, we have no cause for complaint. Many were surprised by how well they did, and no wonder, after the nightmare that was the 2016 season.

The game was not so bad, — we didn’t get blown out and we had our chances — but the high-point was the top of the first, when we jumped out to a 3-0 lead. Dozier’s lead-off home-run was the play of the game. Very sweet. And Rosario’s 2-run shot was impressive.

If we could have got out of the first inning ahead 3-0, it might have been a different ball game.

And if Sano was available.

And if the Yankees weren’t the damn Yankees.

Well, we’ll get ’em next year.

Thanks for the nice season, Twins!

World Series Fever…

This being late October, everybody has naturally got World Series Fever. Say what you will about all those other sports, Foot-Ball, Basket-Ball, Croquet, Hurling, Rugby, Chess, what-have-you… Baseball IS the National Past Time, and when October rolls around, the nation’s eyes are on the diamond, and we wait with bated breath the crowning of the next champion.

The Library of Congress yesterday (Prints and Photos division) posted a news article about the bygone days of World Series fever, in the golden days before television, when the boys would gather around the newspaper scoreboard or the local radio to follow the play-by-play.

Watching World Series scoreboard, Montrose, Colorado, 1939

Watching World Series scoreboard, Montrose, Colorado, 1939

I’ll bet that was fun, standing on the street, watching the action. No commercial interruptions. No instant replays. No expert analysis explaining everything in detail. Well, on second thought, there was probably plenty of that, but on a more local level.

If the boys look pretty sedate in that picture, it might be because the Yankees swept the Series that year, 4 games to 0 over the Cincinnati Reds. A lot of pitching in that series, as the Reds batted .203, while the Yankees did about the same, at .206. The Yankees did hit 7 HR in that series, though, while the Reds could muster nary a one. King Kong Keller hit .438 for the Yankees, with 3 HR and 6 rbi.

Tonight is game 3 or the 2015 series, in NY, with KC leading the Mets, two games to nothing. (As if you didn’t know.)

Kansas City had the top record in the AL, so I like to see them in the series. In the Senior Circuit, the hated St. Louis Cards won 100 games in the regular season, while the Metropolitans only garnered 90. Some might therefore wonder if the best team in the NL has actually made it to the World Series.

But them’s the rules. A KC/St. Louis series would have been fun, though.

Kansas City’s got a good club. With two games gone, I’m not going to make any predictions, but I always like to see the AL take the series, no matter who I think is going to win.

Incidentally, who knows why the KC club is named the Royals? Perhaps you think it is a tip of the cap to the old KC Monarch’s of the old Negro Leagues? Well, then, you are wrong. The Royals are named for the American Royal livestock show, rodeo, horse show, and, I guess, a barbecue competition, held annually in KC since 1899. Turns out that no one knows why the KC Monarchs were named the Monarchs – but it is possibly a tip of the cap to the same Royal livestock show. It’s possible, but nobody knows for sure. Is that all they can think of down there?

Finally, I’d just like to point out for posterity, I did just happen to nail the Twins final record this season, in my prediction post of April 9th.

First time that’s ever happened. We all look for better things next season.

Speeding up the game; pitchers and catcher report!

I heard a brief spot on the radio this week about how baseball’s new commissioner, Robert Manfred, has announced some new rules to speed the pace of the game up. These include:

  • batters have to keep one foot in the batter’s box.
  • timers will measure the time between innings, allowing 2:25 for locally televised games and slightly longer for nationally televised games.
  • Pitchers will need to complete their warm up tosses at the 30 second mark, and batters will “be encouraged” to be in the batter’s box with 20 seconds remaining on the clock.

These rules will be enforced with a system of warnings and fines, with further discipline “for flagrant violators,” and there’s naturally a list of specific exceptions to these rules. Still, it’s a step in the right direction.

I haven’t thought about any additional ways that the game could be sped up. I suppose they could limit the number of  relief pitchers in an inning; I suppose there are a lot of things they could do. Perhaps limit the number of people who can meet at the mound. What do they talk about anyways?

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As long as they are making up rules, I really would like it if they would do something about the constant, unceasing, never-ending, repetitious, non-stop barrage of deafening and distracting sound that we have to endure at the ballpark. Does anyone feel like this contributes to their baseball experience? Does there really need to be loud rock and roll at every momentary break? At every new at-bat? Between every stinking pitch? Do we really need to have commercials on the big scoreboard? Sponsors for every small fragment of the broadcast? Meaningless “contests” between innings? Bugle calls and “clap your hands!” animations to tell the crowd when they should clap?

Let me think about this a moment… okay, I say no. No, we do not. In fact, it’s positively detrimental to my enjoyment of the game, the reason I paid money to come to the ball park.

Perhaps the Twins could occasionally have some silent throwback games, where all that noise is eliminated. I am sure it would really create a startlingly different – and better – ballpark experience.

At least for me.

Pitchers and catchers reported yesterday. Nice long article about new Twin’s manager Paul Molitor in the Star Tribune today – you can find it here. Should be an interesting spring training. New managers and coaches. Pitchers battling for the fifth spot in the rotation. (Ironic for a staff that was so poor last year.) The return of Torii Hunter. The mystery of Aaron Hicks. Buxton and Sano, healthy and close?